Useful Information

HOW TO PICK THE RIGHT FOOD FOR YOUR DOG

Have you ever heard the expression, “One man’s meat is another man’s poison?” Well, that goes for dogs, too! Remember: No food is perfect for all dogs. With that in mind, consider the following information from past WHOLE DOG JOURNAL food reviews:

YOUR DOG’S AGE: Is he a growing puppy? Middle-aged? A senior dog?

YOUR DOG’S CONDITION: Fat dogs, skinny dogs, and dogs who are just right have different requirements. Dogs who get a lot of exercise have different needs than dogs who do little or nothing.

YOUR DOG’S HEALTH HISTORY: Does the dog have any medical conditions that can benefit from a special diet, such as allergies, cancer, digestive difficulties, or a tendency to form kidney stones?

HOW YOU CAN RECOGNIZE GOOD INGREDIENTS IN DOG FOOD

The hallmarks of a high-quality food include the following…
Superior sources of protein. This means either whole, fresh meats or single source meat meal.
A whole-meat source as one of the first two ingredients. (for example: chicken or chicken meal). Better yet would be two meat sources among the top three ingredients.
Whole, unprocessed grains, vegetables, and other foods. A previously unprocessed food has the best chance of surviving the food-making process with some of its nutrients intact.

High quality dry foods should contain a MINIMUM of the following:
Food fragments. Fragments are lower-cost-by-products of another food manufacturing process, such as brewer’s rice and wheat bran.
Meat by-products. Using an animal by-product for a food’s main protein source is indicative of a lower-quality product.

Hallmarks of low-quality dry food:
“Generic” fats or proteins. “Animal protein” and “poultry protein” are far inferior to “beef protein” or “chicken protein.”
Artificial preservatives (including BHA, BHT or Ethoxyquin).
Artificial colors. Your dog doesn’t care what color his food is.
Propylene glycol. Your dog doesn’t need exposure to this chemical which is added to some “chewy” foods to keep them moist.
Sweeteners. Corn syrup, sucrose and other sweetners are sometimes added to lower-quality foods to increase their appeal.